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Salman Khoshroo’s Figurative Wire Sculptures

Salman Khoshroo builds figures out of electric wire, with the resulting character being made for both close inspection and movement. His reflections show the ties between the human machine and the manmade machine. And his kinetic sculptures, in particular, tell of the inherent ability for motion in both of these.

Salman Khoshroo builds figures out of electric wire, with the resulting character being made for both close inspection and movement. His reflections show the ties between the human machine and the manmade machine. And his kinetic sculptures, in particular, tell of the inherent ability for motion in both of these.

On the above the sculpture, which movement settings of oscillating, pendulum and random, the artist says this: “Movement is an indication of the presence of a living entity. Robots and organic beings share a kind of will to move, whether through autonomy or automation. Machines can be aesthetic objects in themselves, precisely crafted and logically spectacular. In this kinetic sculpture the movements are programmed with an Arduino controller and commands are sent electronically to the DC motors. By tuning and finding the right settings, equilibriums of movement can be achieved, bringing the piece into balance.”

The artist’s paintings share aesthetic and conceptual tethers to his sculptures, See a few of these below.

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