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The Acrylic Paintings of Tanner MacLeod

Tanner MacLeod’s acrylic paintings create unexpected characters out of geometric forms, taking influence from primitive computer art. (The artist’s “A Noble Mustachian,” in particular, appears taken from Dire Straits’ “Money for Nothing” video.) Elsewhere, the polygonal arrangements create abstract works.

Tanner MacLeod’s acrylic paintings create unexpected characters out of geometric forms, taking influence from primitive computer art. (The artist’s “A Noble Mustachian,” in particular, appears taken from Dire Straits’ “Money for Nothing” video.) Elsewhere, the polygonal arrangements create abstract works.

The artist’s paintings currently appear at the LA Art Show, as part of Cube Modern Gallery’s booth. (The venue is located in Phoenix.) See more of MacLeod’s work below.

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