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The Recent Paintings of Marc Burckhardt

In Marc Burckhardt’s paintings, the artist’s work tethers classical influences to contemporary comic and pop art. In a recent show at Paul Roosen Contemporary, “Fault Lines," his newer mythological explorations are shown. Burckhardt was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

In Marc Burckhardt’s paintings, the artist’s work tethers classical influences to contemporary comic and pop art. In a recent show at Paul Roosen Contemporary, “Fault Lines,” his newer mythological explorations are shown. Burckhardt was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

“At first glance, Marc Burckhardt’s paintings are reminiscent of the Old Masters of the Flemish Renaissance,” the gallery says. “And Burckhardt actually uses those historical symbols, but consciously interweaves them with contemporary themes. His art is influenced by painters such as Albrecht Dürer, Lucas Cranach and Diego Rivera, but at the same time contains influences from comic artists such as Robert Crumb and Gilbert Shelton. Burckhardt uses a mixture of oils and acrylics for his paintings, often working on wood panel. He understands his mythological imagery as a kind of visual, collective memory: every image is based on symbolic cultural roots that Burckhardt brings to life in his paintings in a very contemporary manner.”

See more works from the show below.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BrURbGdFgUa/

https://www.instagram.com/p/BrGcgpyFLLa/

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