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Rosa de Jong’s Tiny ‘Micro Matter’ Series

In Rosa de Jong's "Micro Matter" series, the sculptor and art director crafts miniature structures that appear to be ripped from the earth. The artist uses varying materials to craft these buildings and landscapes, including cardboard, tree bark, thread, watercolor paint, and plastic. The work is both suspended and placed in capsules, offering a 360-degree view of de Jong’s sculptures for viewers.

In Rosa de Jong‘s “Micro Matter” series, the sculptor and art director crafts miniature structures that appear to be ripped from the earth. The artist uses varying materials to craft these buildings and landscapes, including cardboard, tree bark, thread, watercolor paint, and plastic. The work is both suspended and placed in capsules, offering a 360-degree view of de Jong’s sculptures for viewers.

On the “Cork Island” floating miniatures, in particular, she says this: “Made with bark of a cork tree, two dutch twigs, cardboard, woodlandscenics modeling foliage and thread. I collaborated with my father to create the wooden frames, which include tiny wheels that allow you to adjust the position of the islands.”

See more of her work below.

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