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Abigail Goldman’s Crime Scene ‘Die-o-ramas’

Abigail Goldman, who also serves as an investigator for the federal public defender in Nevada, crafts miniature "Die-o-ramas," each blending violence and a bit of humor. The work shares in the crime fascination of Corinne Botz's work (featured in HF Vol. 33) and the structure-centered dioramas of Thomas Doyle (featured in Hi-Fructose Collected 3). For scale: The humans in these works are less than an inch tall.

Abigail Goldman, who also serves as an investigator for the federal public defender in Nevada, crafts miniature “Die-o-ramas,” each blending violence and a bit of humor. The work shares in the crime fascination of Corinne Botz’s work (featured in HF Vol. 33) and the structure-centered dioramas of Thomas Doyle (featured in Hi-Fructose Collected 3). For scale: The humans in these works are less than an inch tall.

“The ‘Die-o-ramas’ initially appear as mundane suburban scenes adorned with white picket fences and perfectly mowed lawns, but upon closer examination reveal intricate narratives of gruesome crime scenes and violent act,” a statement says. “Goldman’s miniature sculptures are created with engrossing attention to detail at a scale of 1:87 featuring tiny model railroad figures all less than an inch tall. The sculptures’ cute and cheery size sharply contrast with its grim theme.”

See more of Goldman’s work below.

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