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Emily Fromm’s Urban Landscapes Shown in ‘NO VACANCY’

Taking influence from classic American signage and comic art, Emily Fromm crafts bustling scenes taken from corners across Western cities. In an upcoming show at 111 Minna Gallery in San Francisco, “NO VACANCY,” she offers a group of works that show the “over-the-top yet seedy aesthetic of the American West.” The show kicks off Jan. 11 and runs through Feb. 23.


Taking influence from classic American signage and comic art, Emily Fromm crafts bustling scenes taken from corners across Western cities. In an upcoming show at 111 Minna Gallery in San Francisco, “NO VACANCY,” she offers a group of works that show the “over-the-top yet seedy aesthetic of the American West.” The show kicks off Jan. 11 and runs through Feb. 23.


The gallery adds this: “The show will also contain several paintings created for a public art project in conjunction with the San Francisco Arts Commission for San Francisco International Airport, to be installed in early 2020,” the gallery says. “These paintings will ultimately be adapted into ceramic tile mosaic to create large-scale wall-mounted vignettes of Fromm’s San Francisco-centric scenes, which will be installed in the redeveloped Terminal One upon its opening. The paintings will be available to view at 111 Minna, and some of the earlier concept paintings will be available for purchase.”

See more images from the show below.

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