Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

AEC Interesni Kazki’s New Show Inspires Deja Vu, Jamais Vu

In AEC Interesni Kazki's first solo show in France, the surrealist painter offers both new, stirring works and previous pieces with "Déjà vu & Jamais vu,” or "already seen and never seen." Running through Dec. 26, the show opens Friday at the Paris-based venue Adda & Taxie. The artist was last mentioned on our site here.

In AEC Interesni Kazki‘s first solo show in France, the surrealist painter offers both new, stirring works and previous pieces with “Déjà vu & Jamais vu,” or “already seen and never seen.” Running through Dec. 26, the show opens Friday at the Paris-based venue Adda & Taxie. The artist was last mentioned on our site here.

The artist explains the name of the show: “‘Deja vu’ is something when you feel that have seen but dont remember when, maybe it came from subconcious or forgotten memories of the childhood or comes from another dimensions of the Universe or from the past life. And ‘Jamais vu’ is something opposite to ‘Deja vu’ – what is never seen, what is impossible to imagine, probably it is the future or something behind human lifes and imagination …. I am going to represent several new pieces which are done in different techniques- acrylic painting and ink drawing on canvases and several pieces in watercolors and gouache on paper. Also will be represented several acrylic paintings and ink drawings from my past exhibition The Earth Is Flat which happened last January … So, by the irony I am going to show new pieсes which are ‘Jamais vu’ in this context and pieces already shown before – ‘Deja vu,’ but anyway both of them will be ‘Jamais vu’ for the French viewer.”

See some of the artist’s recent public work below.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Chicago-born artist Kayla Mahaffrey crafts portraits of subjects enveloped by pop totems and surreal elements. Her works are rendered in watercolors and acrylics, each oozing with vibrancy and candy colors. Her practice moves between illustration and fine art.
The action-filled paintings of Conor Harrington pit nameless political tribes against each other. His explorations of patriotism and contemporary social themes come in the form of Baroque figures, combining classical oil painting techniques and graffiti influences. The artist most recently expressed this thread in "The Story of Us and Them" at HENI Gallery in London.
The oil paintings of Lukifer Aurelius carry a surreal and mystic energy, its subjects often in a transformative state. The Brisbane artist is part of a new duo show with Alex Garant at BeinArt Gallery in Australia titled "Seeing Between," running through May 27. The gallery says that the painter’s figures are “seemingly infused with fire or, at the very least, embers, striking a chord with perhaps our most primitive memories.”
"I don’t transfer what I have caught and understood in my head onto a picture plane, but just draw things because I cannot digest them," writes Atsushi Koyama in his artist statement. Koyama seems to be obsessed with the inner workings of objects and even anatomies. He renders mechanisms and body parts with translucent pigments on black backgrounds, their innards aglow like x-rays. Though they're mapped out with the diligence of a blueprint, the diagrams in Koyama's paintings come together as colorful designs that one can appreciate on a purely visual level.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List