Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Fernan Odang’s Surreal, Socially Charged Paintings

Fernan Odang's surreal paintings and drawings explore the social and political issues of today. From sexual themes to absurd portraits of political leaders, there’s both a terror and humor in each of his paintings, often cast in a single hue that underscores the horror of the proceedings. The self-taught artist currently resides in Manila.

Fernan Odang‘s surreal paintings and drawings explore the social and political issues of today. From sexual themes to absurd portraits of political leaders, there’s both a terror and humor in each of his paintings, often cast in a single hue that underscores the horror of the proceedings. The self-taught artist currently resides in Manila.

“[He explores] the idea of internal damage by depicting oppressive and corrupt systems that prey on the poor and underprivileged in a series of charcoal on paper works,” a statement says. “Odang chose to delve into issues such as sexual abuse, drug addiction, and political manipulation. He interprets the nature of abusers by correlating them with animals, using the image of pigs, for instance, as a stand-in for greed, or dogs as a proxy for sexual predators. In effect, his farcical subjects functioned as caricatures used to illustrate harsh realities.”

See more of his work below.


Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Jim Shaw's paintings are striking fusions of pop culture, political histories, and found, scenic backdrops. The artist's varied approach has evolved over decades, with his recent work working with acrylics layered on muslin. Some of the works implement "theatrical scenic backdrops" purchased by Shaw, combining canvases from the 1940s and 1950s and his own style.
British-Iranian artist Nikoo Bafti crafts vibrant scenes that represent Mother Nature, pulling inspiration from varying mythologies. The artist's background includes studies in illustration, with time spent animation development at Disney Channels in London before she embarked on a career in personal and freelance work.
Caleb Weintraub confronts his audience with an alternative, morally-stripped and intense digital fantasy world where children hold guns on each other around misplaced, irresponsible adult figures. "I make paintings of a disintegrating world where humanity has gone awry," Weintraub said of his work in a previous interview. In a sense, he works in parallels to the present state of children's overstimulation and desensitization in a controlled atmosphere. The bright colors and video game-like renderings complicate the readings of his work, however. The viewer may find himself questioning the relationship between his techniques and conceptual leanings. Weintraub is choosing to create, at first glance, friendly cartoon narratives with dark content below the surface.
Martin C. Herbst's “Spheres” are transforming, painted faces on stainless steel spheres, seemingly shifting expressions as viewers move the pieces or their perspectives. The artist was inspired by Parmigianino’s 1500s painting “Self-portrait in a Convex Mirror," known for its distorted effect. Herbst was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List