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Poncili Creacion’s Wearable and Interactive Sculptures

Collective Poncili Creacion combines puppetry, performance, and sculpture for odd, vibrant shows across the globe. The group, led by identical twins Pablo and Efrain Del Hierro, describes itself as facilitating “interactions between the fields of Objects and Reality.” In each of their projects, they refer to the wearable creatures and interactive sculptures they build as “objects.”


Collective Poncili Creacion combines puppetry, performance, and sculpture for odd, vibrant shows across the globe. The group, led by identical twins Pablo and Efrain Del Hierro, describes itself as facilitating “interactions between the fields of Objects and Reality.” In each of their projects, they refer to the wearable creatures and interactive sculptures they build as “objects.”

“Since 2012 they have been working with large-scale foam objects in the form of installations, sculptures and communication tools,” says Clocktower. “Their sculptures and installations are always accompanied by a performatic act they call “Communication Ritual” that incorporates experimental dance, manipulation of objects and interaction with the public.”

See more of their work below.

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