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Taiichiro Yoshida’s Recent Encrusted Sculptures

Taiichiro Yoshida’s animal sculptures are crafted using classical hot metalworking techniques and encrusted with touches of flora and fauna. His recent works continue this thread with engrossing renditions of creatures from across the globe, each carrying grace at both a distance and close inspection.


Taiichiro Yoshida’s animal sculptures are crafted using classical hot metalworking techniques and encrusted with touches of flora and fauna. His recent works continue this thread with engrossing renditions of creatures from across the globe, each carrying grace at both a distance and close inspection.

“Metal has long been a symbol of religion, people’s livelihoods, and times of the times, until the modern era, was also a symbol of power and a tool for pledge,” the artist has said, as translated. “This is a factor that gives the image of thought, spirit, consciousness, intimidation feeling to metal. Since the works created from my mind are many images of living things and have an assertive impression on the existence of life, it is easy for metals to express their own morphological forms well.”

See more of his recent work below.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BlcWy_iHFw7/

https://www.instagram.com/p/Be5M_GcFMvl/

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