Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Origami Used to Create ‘Lava’ in Spain Festival

More than 10,000 pieces of origami, strategic lighting, and a smoke machine were used to create “lava” on an abandoned building in Spain’s Catalan region. During the annual Lluèrnia Festival, a celebration of fire and light, David Oliva of SP25 Arquitectura and Anna Juncà of Atelier 4 combined their talents to create the display.

More than 10,000 pieces of origami, strategic lighting, and a smoke machine were used to create “lava” on an abandoned building in Spain’s Catalan region. During the annual Lluèrnia Festival, a celebration of fire and light, David Oliva of SP25 Arquitectura and Anna Juncà of Atelier 4 combined their talents to create the display.


“Flames created with natural colors associated with fire and lava (different shades of red, yellow and orange),” SP25 says, as translated. “Some elements that by themselves adapt to the dark environment and illuminate it. Shoemaker’s figurehead is used, a classic game completely changed in context. The four tips of each element generate a flame mat that adapts to the urban topography of the environment.”

See more shots from the event below.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
New York based Japanese artist Kumi Yamashita, featured here, creates unique pieces of art using everyday objects and materials like paper and plastic. Among her most notable and surprising works are her Light-shadow series, where materials are arranged in relation to a single light source to reveal the true subject in the shadows. Opening on September 11th, Yamashita will exhibit a variety of new works in a solo exhibition at Art Front Gallery in Tokyo. In addition to her popular shadow art, she will present a series inspired by origami, the art of folding.
Origami artist João Charrua creates unexpected figures out of single squares of paper. Instead of relying on recognizable forms, the Portugal-based sculptor tends to create entirely new, surreal creatures. Elsewhere, he offers odes to artists he admires, from the sculptures of Philip Jackson to the above creation, which pays homage to a legendary surrealist.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List