Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Jack Irving’s Otherworldly Wearable Art

Jack Irving’s wearable art carries a texture and movement that take the human body to otherworldly places. In his latest “live installations,” whether on the runway or at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, his works appear to burst from their models. These settings also show how his work functions in both broad daylight and the sets he designs himself.

Jack Irving’s wearable art carries a texture and movement that take the human body to otherworldly places. In his latest “live installations,” whether on the runway or at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, his works appear to burst from their models. These settings also show how his work functions in both broad daylight and the sets he designs himself.

“Jack Irving creates collections of wearable art and installations with a passion for science and theatrics combined,” the museum says. “… Jack Irving’s mission is to engulf the world in a fantastical spectacle, incorporating all elements of theatricality with a love for colliding technology with live performance. His live installation references the natural and supernatural world.”

See more of Irving’s work below.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
The "live sculptures" of Roman Ermakov combine fashion, fine art, and installation work, each offering an energy and vibrancy powered by the humans bearing his works. These creations from the Moscow-based artist enliven both the runaway and public spaces. His recent work, as shown, takes influence from the costume parties of Germany's Bauhaus school in the 1920s, where these artists' radical ideas in architecture and sculpture were also channeled.
For her new collection, Iris van Herpen collaborated with kinetic sculptor Anthony Howe, with riveting results on the runway. "Hypnosis" features several new pieces from van Herpen, who was featured on our site here. She says that Howe’s “Ominverse” sculpture serves as a “portal” into the collection.
Dutch designer Iris van Herpen creates apparel that can appear both organic or frozen in movement, whether her fashion art emulates a splash of water or writhing, tentacle-like forms. Herpen’s versatility in shown in how her pieces seemed ripped out of varying eras.
Turkish-American designer Eda Yorulmazoğlu crafts wild costumes, with both distinct body of works and individual creatures as part of her repertoire. Part-fashion designer, part-textile artist, she navigates several spheres, all carrying an absurdism and vibrancy bolstered by bringing them out into the public.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List