Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Limited ‘Piggies’ Print by Annie Owens Available in Store

Hi-Fructose co-founder Annie Owens has a new giclée print available in our store. The 13" x 20" "Piggies" prints are limited to 40, with 20 of those sold in the Hi-Fructose store. All are signed and numbered. Order it here.


Hi-Fructose co-founder Annie Owens has a new giclée print available in our store. The 13″ x 20″ “Piggies” prints are limited to 40, with 20 of those sold in the Hi-Fructose store. All are signed and numbered. Order it here.

The giclée prints have a 1″ white border, on archival heavyweight hot-press 100% cotton paper.

More details: $13 shipping, ships FEDEX Ground in a cello sleeve inside a 4″ wide cardboard shipping tube. Since prints are limited, they can not be replaced please be sure to double check details of your shipping address, especially if paying with PayPal. Please allow 2 weeks for packout and delivery.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Though gorgeously rendered, Chester Arnold’s paintings don’t idealize the state of nature. It depicts how, despite humanity’s best efforts, the Earth endures the accumulation of humanity’s waste and development. Cascading piles of tires and trash becomes their own mountainous formations.
Frenchman Lou Ros is self-taught and he used to tag walls. You can see both in his work. He didn’t learn the academic tradition and then proceed to tear it down. He works from photographs; he wants to paint stills from films. Photographs and still shots capture moments in flux. That’s what Ros does. He paints until he finds the feeling he seeks or else discovers. Then he finishes. It doesn’t matter whether the work itself is academically done. What matters is that he’s done. He works rapidly, in short bursts of energy. That’s the tagger’s MO. In and out, say what you have to say, clear and simple, before the flics arrive.
Evan Lovejoy's paintings are inspired by both the artist's love of the natural world and his anguish due to its destruction. Our complicated relationship with animals is shown through the artist's varying ways of depicting them. Within the same work, a beast moves between a sense of realism, cartoonish rendering, and a more pop-surrealist sensibility.
Rebecca Guay is an artist whose dreamlike watercolor paintings invite viewers to languish in their sensual imagery. Ornamented with gold leaf, her female protagonists luxuriate on lofty clouds and in cool lagoons. The characters look like goddesses unfettered by mortal woes, at ease in their nudity. Guay's style of rendering figures with elongated faces and limbs evokes the Pre-Raphaelite movement of the 19th century, though her flat style gives her work a more contemporary look reminiscent of Japanese illustration. Take a look at some of her latest works below.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List