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Peter Ferguson Shares New Work in ‘Mock Robin’

Blending horror, humor, and fantasy, Peter Ferguson shows new work in a show at Roq La Rue titled “Mock Robin.” Running Nov. 2 through Nov. 28, the show places monsters, strange machines, and other strange elements in scenes that traverse history. The venue says his work recalls “Dutch Renaissance painting, old National Geographic photography, and 18th century British Naval history.” Ferguson was last featured on HiFructose.com here.


Blending horror, humor, and fantasy, Peter Ferguson shows new work in a show at Roq La Rue titled “Mock Robin.” Running Nov. 2 through Nov. 28, the show places monsters, strange machines, and other strange elements in scenes that traverse history. The venue says his work recalls “Dutch Renaissance painting, old National Geographic photography, and 18th century British Naval history.” Ferguson was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

“Meticulously painted, Ferguson’s darkly humorous narratives evoke an achronological magical realism, featuring composite cities and landscapes comprised of everything from from 16th Century European towns to early 20th century Americana (or Canadiana as the case may be),” the gallery says. “Combining grandiose narratives of the great ages of exploration with a distinctly paranormal bent, Ferguson’s work subtly hovers the line between fantasy, surrealism, and realism without ever falling into either of them fully. Norman Rockwell meets H.P. Lovecraft.”

See more works from the show below.

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