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Nahoko Kojima’s Lifesized ‘Shiro’ Paper Cut Sculpture

Nahoko Kojima’s talents in paper cut sculpture produced her largest work to date in the life-sized whale “‘Shiro” at the Bangkok Art and Culture Centre in Thailand. From the initial concept to its completion, the project took a year of work from the artist. Kojima was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

Nahoko Kojima’s talents in paper cut sculpture produced her largest work to date in the life-sized whale “‘Shiro” at the Bangkok Art and Culture Centre in Thailand. From the initial concept to its completion, the project took a year of work from the artist. Kojima was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

“The name Shiro means ‘white’ in Japanese because when she saw the Blue Whale, Kojima thought the the animal actually looked white,” a statement says. “Kojima had Japanese Washi paper custom made for her in especially large sizes from a paper mill in Japan and took months to cut the two flat sheets based on her drawings in her Central London studio. Kojima is known to alter the designs as she cuts them, in effect making it impossible to recreate similar works by digitising and mechanising drawings alone. She prototyped Shiro first, using nylon threads to tie the single sheets, eventually arriving at a form that matched her vision.”

See more of her work below.

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