Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Julia Faber’s Explorations of Nature, Technology

Blending painting and drawing, Julia Faber pits nature against the real-life robots that emulate its creatures. The Vienna-based artist contrasts realistic, painted backdrops or animals with stunning linework. In the past, Faber’s work traversed humanity’s own periled social structures and history. This new body of work appears to explore our effect on the world outside of our physical bodies.

Blending painting and drawing, Julia Faber pits nature against the real-life robots that emulate its creatures. The Vienna-based artist contrasts realistic, painted backdrops or animals with stunning linework. In the past, Faber’s work traversed humanity’s own periled social structures and history. This new body of work appears to explore our effect on the world outside of our physical bodies.


“Julia Faber’s hyperrealistic painting is concerned with themes of the formation and disciplining of bodies, through citations of classical mythological motifs and illustrations of forced pedagogical regulations of the body from textbooks and newspaper advertisements from the 19th century,” says the publisher Schlebrügge.Editor.

See more of her work below.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
The paintings of Brett Ferry, created using acrylics and oil on board, defy in both materials used and the components depicted. The blending of vibrant abstractions and natural forms feel like clashes of realities. The Australian artist’s works may deceive and appear as digital paintings, yet this simply part of the author’s charge.
The lush paintings of Xiao Wang carry cerebral themes and unexpected hues. The tension conveyed in these works comes from both the artist’s rendering of each subject and the unexplained narratives contained within each. All of these aspects, along with his knack for realism, create a cinematic sensibility in Wang's paintings.
French artist Antoine Cordet’s ghostly acrylic and oil paintings appear as portraits that have been tampered with, whether out of disdain or abstractions arising from memory. Despite the seemingly despondent expressions of its subjects, the paintings are given an unexpected energy from these touches. Adding to the mystique is the attire of the youth in the images, which ranges from contemporary to vague costumes. The artist was last featured on HiFructose.com here.
Jenny Morgan’s honed blend of abstraction and realistic portraiture unlocks new paths to the personalities she paints. In a new survey of the past decade of her work, viewers can see how that sensibility evolved—and how she approaches giving the portrait treatment to celebrities, when commissioned by national publications. The Museum of Contemporary Art Denver hosts this exhibition, which runs through Aug. 27. Morgan created the cover for Hi-Fructose Vol. 39, and she was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List