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David Leitner’s Striking Figurative Work

Austrian artist David Leitner’s stirring work takes him across the world, whether it’s in murals, illustrations, or stirring drawings that react to his surroundings. In his black, graphical line drawings, the artist’s cascading figures make use of neighboring contours and abstractions.


Austrian artist David Leitner’s stirring work takes him across the world, whether it’s in murals, illustrations, or stirring drawings that react to his surroundings. In his black, graphical line drawings, the artist’s cascading figures make use of neighboring contours and abstractions.

The above pieces comes from his experiences in Los Angeles: “What struck me first after coming to LA, was the vast homelessness and poverty right next to an horrendous amount of wealth, he wrote. Portrayed below is one of approximately 17,000 people living on skid row in Downtown LA. In total, there are about 53,195 homeless people in the LA County area, next to 268,138 millionaires. If you are living in the LA area and want to help, the Downtown Women’s Center and the Los Angeles Mission are always looking for volunteers.”


See more of the artist’s work, including his painted pieces, below.


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