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The New Contemporary Art Magazine

The Dreamlike Paintings of Jos. A Smith

Jos. A Smith’s dreamlike paintings move between elegance and cacophony. His horse-riders, specifically, carry a quality have a surreal, yet granular quality that invites close inspection. Part of the artist's work his rooted in his practice of "of trance techniques learned from the Nyngmapa sect of Tibetan Buddhism, research psychologists, anthropologists, and shamans with my own dream records to make that membrane between my waking state and my unconscious more permeable."

Jos. A Smith’s dreamlike paintings move between elegance and cacophony. His horse-riders, specifically, carry a quality have a surreal, yet granular quality that invites close inspection. Part of the artist’s work his rooted in his practice of “of trance techniques learned from the Nyngmapa sect of Tibetan Buddhism, research psychologists, anthropologists, and shamans with my own dream records to make that membrane between my waking state and my unconscious more permeable.”

“I am fascinated by that world of imagery that exists at every moment within us, but breaks into consciousness only fleetingly during our days and, for most of us, in fragmentary form upon waking from dreaming sleep. I have spent my adult life searching for ways to explore this hidden inner world. My art is a record of those journeys. It is a means of sharing my sense of wonder at what I see. My imagery often surprises me as it evolves on the paper or canvas.”

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