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Neva Hosking’s Biographical ‘Personal Geography’ Drawings

Neva Hosking to craft biographical drawings on scraps and unexpected surfaces is rooted in a time long before having her formal training, yet that practice has endured. This approach “built an understanding that a broken and fractured viewpoint often presents a more accurate and multi-faceted view of whatever subject needs to be explored,” she says. The result shows a prism that represents a complex, ever-changing humanity.

Neva Hosking to craft biographical drawings on scraps and unexpected surfaces is rooted in a time long before having her formal training, yet that practice has endured. This approach “built an understanding that a broken and fractured viewpoint often presents a more accurate and multi-faceted view of whatever subject needs to be explored,” she says. The result shows a prism that represents a complex, ever-changing humanity.

“Neva Hosking is motivated by the intimacy of experience,” a statement says. “Through the act of mapping personal geography with the fragmentation and collation of imagery, Hosking aims to bring a stream-of-consciousness approach to portraiture in an attempt to better present the way we view our own memories of those in our lives today.”

See more of Hosking’s work below.

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