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Sasha Ignatiadou’s Vibrant, Vivid Illustrations

The acrylic paintings of illustrator Sasha Ignatiadou carry a vibrancy and visceral detail. The artist’s work tends to leave viewers on guessing on the origins of his creation, which outside of her acrylic work, moves between watercolor and digital approaches.

The acrylic paintings of illustrator Sasha Ignatiadou carry a vibrancy and visceral detail. The artist’s work tends to leave viewers on guessing on the origins of his creation, which outside of her acrylic work, moves between watercolor and digital approaches.

The Russian artist, who’s based in Germany, talks about how her approach: “I started to draw in 2001. Then I entered the art school and since then the drawing has become the main element of my life. Now I draw on a variety of techniques: acrylic and watercolor illustrations, oil painting and digital art. What really inspires me is the very process of creating. I choose simple subjects that I fill with complex ornaments and color combinations.”

See more of her work below.

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