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Shoichi Okumura’s Engrossing Mixed-Media Paintings on Silk

Crafted in Chinese ink and mineral pigment on silk, Shoichi Okumura's gorgeous compositions blend figurative and floral elements. After moving to Tokyo with his parents, Beijing-born painter would garnered global in his studies. Today, the artist’s received multiple awards for his absorbing, large-scale pieces.

Crafted in Chinese ink and mineral pigment on silk, Shoichi Okumura‘s gorgeous compositions blend figurative and floral elements. After moving to Tokyo with his parents, Beijing-born painter would garnered global in his studies. Today, the artist’s received multiple awards for his absorbing, large-scale pieces.

“Apart from the figures, the flowers and fruits he paints are also an important part of the works’ charm,” his site says. “In the beginning they were mostly plants viewed traditionally to be auspicious omens, but starting in 2016 he began to incorporate plants from other countries as well, such as a cacti. This ability to mix elements which have been stylized overtime by forebearers throughout a long history, with elements which have been stylized through repeated sketching by the artist, along with the natural ease with which they mix is truly a mark of great skill.”

See more of Okumura’s work below.

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