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The Wood Carvings of Fernando Rosas

Fernando Rosas conjures surreal figures out of wood and other natural materials, faces and forms packed with drama emerging. Using varying types of wood with clay and metal adds to the disconcerting nature to the works, their anguish and peril seemingly organic in nature.


Fernando Rosas conjures surreal figures out of wood and other natural materials, faces and forms packed with drama emerging. Using varying types of wood with clay and metal adds to the disconcerting nature to the works, their anguish and peril seemingly organic in nature.



“ … My work is quite frenetic, maybe not so much in order to see the finished work but rather to quickly get that silent block, which is the trunk, to start telling me something, otherwise there is a lot of anguish,” said in an interview with the International Sculpture Center, as translated. “I have seen many sculptors, carvers who are able to see what is inside the trunk or stone and for that reason do not rush into the carving; I do not see anything in the virgin matter, that’s why I urgently need to start stripping what’s inside.”

See more of his work below.


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