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Randy Ortiz’s Dark-Surrealist Drawings

Randy Ortiz’s stirring drawings adorn gallery walls and album covers, each showing the artist’s knack for horror and surrealism. Works such as "Rejoice, for Tonight It Is a World That We Bury" (below) offer disconcerting narratives in progress, rendered in graphite.

Randy Ortiz’s stirring drawings adorn gallery walls and album covers, each showing the artist’s knack for horror and surrealism. Works such as “Rejoice, for Tonight It Is a World That We Bury” (below) offer disconcerting narratives in progress, rendered in graphite.

“Randy Ortiz began life as a burrowing freshwater larva,” an unconventional bio says. “At this stage, he was toothless, with rudimentary eyes, and fed on microorganisms. He transformed into an adult through metamorphosis similar to most amphibians. It involved a radical rearrangement of internal organs, development of eyes and transformation from a mud-dwelling filter feeder into an efficient swimming parasite and sexual tyrannosaur.”

See more of Ortiz’s work below.


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