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Stuart Holland’s Eerie Charcoal Drawings

In Stuart Holland's charcoal drawings, reality is questioned through massive architecture and solitary figures. There’s both a cerebral and magical quality to these scenes, vague in its ties to actual reality. The gray values in his drawings, whether rendering abstract or geometric forms, add to their psychological nature.


In Stuart Holland‘s charcoal drawings, reality is questioned through massive architecture and solitary figures. There’s both a cerebral and magical quality to these scenes, vague in its ties to actual reality. The gray values in his drawings, whether rendering abstract or geometric forms, add to their psychological nature.

“The subjects of these works illustrate various phases of growth in cultivating a sense of Self and purpose in a reality where chaos and consciousness are in constant flux,” the artist says. “As these figures travel within these environments, they undergo transcendental growth, finding strength, solace, and absolution in their exploration. With these higher states of consciousness on the horizon, contact with ‘selflessness’ tempers, and even subdues, the Ego; nothing exists in isolation, and all is but a microcosm of a larger plane of existence.”

See more of the artist’s work below.

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