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Damon Soule Retrospective Coming to Mirus Gallery

Damon Soule’s dazzling, psychedelic mixed-media work has seen major evolutions during the past 20 years. In a new retrospective show at Mirus Gallery in Denver, we see those progressions in vivid detail. The show runs Oct. 6 through Nov. 14 at the gallery. Soule was the cover artists for Hi-Fructose Vol. 17.

Damon Soule’s dazzling, psychedelic mixed-media work has seen major evolutions during the past 20 years. In a new retrospective show at Mirus Gallery in Denver, we see those progressions in vivid detail. The show runs Oct. 6 through Nov. 14 at the gallery. Soule was the cover artists for Hi-Fructose Vol. 17.



“For me, this show is an introspection on my devotion to making stuff,” the artist says. “I looked at this retrospective as an opportunity to get unapologetically self-referential. Looking through my old work got me excited to revisit some of the themes, materials, and aesthetic I’ve all but abandoned along the way. As far as the title goes, it was just a silly pun. Though, on further reflection, the seemingly tenuous tethering of the golden ratio, and the concept of time is as good as any question to pose. After all, nothing is unrelated, and having a good naval gazing proposition to cram through your filter is part of the process.”

See more work from the retrospective show below.

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