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The Robotic Sculptures of Server Demirtas

The mechanical sculptures of Server Demirtas move and shift with lifelike purpose. While some of his creations expose their interworkings, others are vague in their inner processes. "Scuffle" is meant to represent the refugees of the world, moving in unison with a startling fluidity.

The mechanical sculptures of Server Demirtas move and shift with lifelike purpose. While some of his creations expose their interworkings, others are vague in their inner processes. “Scuffle” is meant to represent the refugees of the world, moving in unison with a startling fluidity.

“His studio is his home,” a statement says. “Demirtaş conceives and designs the mechanics and produces his sculptures by himself in his studio in Taksim, Istanbul. The workspace is filled with a wide variety of objects from vintage toys to sculptures, plants, and a few odds and ends neatly displayed on shelves.”

See more of the artist’s work below.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BY-lsxVDQxB/?taken-by=server_demirtas_

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