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The Haunting Characters of Edward Kinsella III

Edward Kinsella III has a knack for crafting monsters. Using just a few hues and strokes, the St. Louis artist creates haunting portraits and illustrations that are seemingly simple, yet wholly cerebral. Though young, the artist has forged his career in both gallery shows and a teaching practice.

Edward Kinsella III has a knack for crafting monsters. Using just a few hues and strokes, the St. Louis artist creates haunting portraits and illustrations that are seemingly simple, yet wholly cerebral. Though young, the artist has forged his career in both gallery shows and a teaching practice.


His Illustration Academy profile offers some insight into his rise: “Believe it or not, Ted attended two summers of The Illustration Academy program before becoming one of our youngest instructors,” the school says. “Shortly after his time at the Academy, Ted’s career quickly evolved. His work has been commissioned by a variety of top magazines and publishers internationally.”

That client list includes The New York, Rolling Stone, The Criterion Collection, Penguin, Simon and Schuster, and several, several other publications and brands. See more of his work below.

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