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Tenmyouya Hisashi’s Time-Jumping Paintings Use Ancient Media

Using acrylics, black gesso, gold leaf, and wood, Tenmyouya Hisashi calls upon the history of Japanese painting in narratives and creations that span the past, present, and future. These works render a robotic transport with the same elegance of centuries-old weaponry. His sweeping battles scenes and portraits function under the banner of his “Neo Nihonga" style.

Using acrylics, black gesso, gold leaf, and wood, Tenmyouya Hisashi calls upon the history of Japanese painting in narratives and creations that span the past, present, and future. These works render a robotic transport with the same elegance of centuries-old weaponry. His sweeping battles scenes and portraits function under the banner of his “Neo Nihonga” style.

“Neo Nihonga is an art concept formulated in 2001 by Tenmyouya as an antithesis to modern Japanese-style painting, an art form that has lost substance sticking to traditional materials like mineral pigments, glue and ink, in its role as an opposite concept to modern Western-style painting,” his site says. Neo Nihonga is a new genre using new materials such as acrylic paint, while at once referring to characteristic features of Japanese art, such as a traditional Japanese line drawing, decorative, symbolic and playful elements.”

See more of his work below.


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