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Scott Kirschner’s Stirring, Surreal Paintings

Scott Kirschner’s provoking paintings obscure as many as they reveal, blending fantasy and dark surrealism in each scene. His fine art practice is complemented from an illustration career, where he became one of the first major artists associated with the Magic: The Gathering card game. His recent shows, with galleries such as Arch Enemy Arts, offer an unchained look inside the artist’s mind.

Scott Kirschner’s provoking paintings obscure as many as they reveal, blending fantasy and dark surrealism in each scene. His fine art practice is complemented from an illustration career, where he became one of the first major artists associated with the Magic: The Gathering card game. His recent shows, with galleries such as Arch Enemy Arts, offer an unchained look inside the artist’s mind.

“Scott’s work is somber, haunting, and beautiful, expertly using surreal imagery and extraordinary characters to calm and to center stories that explore many of the more difficult parts of life, weaving curiosity, whimsy, and magic into journeys through dark places, like the original versions of our favorite fairy tales,” a statement says.

See more of the painter’s work below.

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