Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

The Lush Oil Paintings of Liora Ostroff

The oil paintings of Liora Ostroff, with varying textures and contemporary imagery, call upon the history of the form. With her lush environments and occasionally morbid edges, she navigates humanity in both vulnerable and surreal terms.


The oil paintings of Liora Ostroff, with varying textures and contemporary imagery, call upon the history of the form. With her lush environments and occasionally morbid edges, she navigates humanity in both vulnerable and surreal terms.


“Liora Ostroff’s current body of work uses paired art-historical themes with imagery drawn from contemporary life,” a recent statement says. “Giotto’s architectural compositions meet Baltimore’s brick facades, and stiff groupings of saints become young partygoers and couples. She references Da Vinci’s lyrical hand gestures or Van Eyck’s colorful motifs to compose a new scene. Either violent or serene, these paintings exemplify Ostroff’s contemplations on time, place, politics and the self. Lust devolves into a misandrist fantasy; a quiet Shabbat table setting is overcome with swastikas. The incessant specter of droning helicopters over the city replaces the glow and radiance of angels, which are so ubiquitous in the Renaissance compositions. In these paintings, history and the present collapse in on each other.”

See more of Ostroff’s work below.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Setting soft and supple nudes against graphic patterns and textures, Brooklyn-based painter Sharon Sprung utilizes the tension between abstraction and realism to appease her own inner dichotomies and create art that expresses emotional complexities. But unlike many artists who muddle the polarities of figuration and abstraction into ambiguity, Sprung leaves them distinct, engendering a contrast that intensifies the impact of each.
The hyper-realistic oil paintings of Joshua Suda will make you question whether you’re looking at a painting or a photograph as he recreates the features of the human face with stunning accuracy. Going beyond replicating life, many of Suda’s pieces also have elements of surrealism. Bizarre compositions, mixed with Suda’s impressive attention to detail, result in uncanny contortions of the human face. He often breaks the fourth wall, playing with the foreground and background to make it appear that the subject is bursting through the surface of the piece. In other works, he paints to mimic other media, replicating the detail of everything from pencil drawings to old photographs and contrasting them with how the subjects might appear to the human eye.
Manuel Zamudio's oil paintings deftly blend realistic portraits with elements of street art. The Texas artist’s work comes to us through our Submission page (here). Over the last few years, Zamudio has shown his work through Texas and Mexico City.
Instead of capturing a single moment in time, Clive Head’s oil paintings reveal multiple perspectives and actions within a single setting. Tracking a complete, single figure within works like “To the Silence of Tiresias,” below, is difficult, yet the broader humanity of that place and a wider timeframe are revealed upon inspection.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List