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Illustrator Victo Ngai’s Stirring, Recent Works

Victo Ngai’s dramatic illustrations are packed with elements from fantasy and contemporary life. Whether in personal or editorial work, her talent in narrative shines. The Hong Kong-born, New York-based illustrator most often plays with scale in her stirring works.


Victo Ngai’s dramatic illustrations are packed with elements from fantasy and contemporary life. Whether in personal or editorial work, her talent in narrative shines. The Hong Kong-born, New York-based illustrator most often plays with scale in her stirring works.

The artist has offered this one living in multiple countries: “Being in a foreign land forced me out of my comfort zone and routines. The excitement of the new place, as well as the disorientation and discomfort led me to reexamining the familiars and the mundanes with a new pair of lens, this helps me think out of the box when creating. Being emerged in multiple cultures also granted me valuable arsenals of both Eastern and Western thinking, stories, philosophies and metaphors to draw inspiration from.”

See more of her work below.

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