Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Sena Kwon’s Grand and Vulnerable Illustrations

Illustrator Sena Kwon excels in both grandiose and quiet moments, with a flair for injecting whimsy into her works. The South Korea-born, New York City-based artist seems to pull from both mythology and the contemporary experience. Whether via film posters or emblazoning apparel, her work carries over to other formats and benefits from artist’s distinctive, unexpected palettes.

Illustrator Sena Kwon excels in both grandiose and quiet moments, with a flair for injecting whimsy into her works. The South Korea-born, New York City-based artist seems to pull from both mythology and the contemporary experience. Whether via film posters or emblazoning apparel, her work carries over to other formats and benefits from artist’s distinctive, unexpected palettes.

“She enjoys art and cinema from across the world. Sena developed a deep appreciation of various cultures after living in multiple countries including Japan, Canada, and Australia. This journey led Sena to become a narrative illustrator and graphic designer. She communicates through detailed line drawings that accentuate both the cultural specificity and universality of international myths and religious parables.”

See more of her work below.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Amsterdam-based artist Stefan Glerum creates retrofuturistic illustrations, in a distinctively clear yet vibrant style. At times, these worlds appear closer to our own than we would want them to, depicting obsessions with technology and a desperation that recalls the speculative sci-fi of yesterday. This style lends itself to the artist’s commercial work, in which the artist’s work is distinguished in its off-kilter take on a variety of topics.
With “A Volta,” Allouche Gallery looks at the evolution of the legendary b-boy and street artist Doze Green through paintings and drawings. In the show, viewers find an artist who influenced a generation and a transformative moment in his practice upon moving to Brazil. Green was most recently featured in Hi-Fructose's print magazine with Volume 35.
The practice of Jesse Draxler, who recently illustrated the cover of the new Daughters album, combines painting and photographic collage. Working primarily in grayscale, both the artist’s illustrative and fine art work are packed with harrowing portraits. The artist has also crafted work for the bands Vowws and Deafheaven.
Jenny Morgan's (featured in HF Vol. 21) paintings reveal beauty in simplicity. She often depicts nude figures with poignant expressions, stylizing their bodies to fit her sunrise-hued palette in lieu of focusing on minuscule details like hairs and wrinkles. The simplification of her subjects gives her work a glossed-over effect that pushes it from objective realism into surreal territory. For her latest exhibition "The Golden Hour" at Plus Gallery in Denver, Morgan explored notions of spirituality and the cycle of life. While her major focus has always been faces, often using herself as a subject, her exhibition features a substantial amount of paintings of skulls, alluding to the fading nature of youth and the ephemerality of the body. Take a look at the work in the show below and check out "The Golden Hour" on view through October 18.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List