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Raquel van Haver’s Massive Mixed-Media Narratives

Raquel van Haver's mixed-media scenes on burlap, using materials like oils, charcoal, tar, wood, and more, offer riveting and socially conscious narratives. The works carry notes of street art and historical references, crafted in relief-style, varying planes. The artist was born in Bogota, Colombia, and she's currently based in Amsterdam.

Raquel van Haver‘s mixed-media scenes on burlap, using materials like oils, charcoal, tar, wood, and more, offer riveting and socially conscious narratives. The works carry notes of street art and historical references, crafted in relief-style, varying planes. The artist was born in Bogota, Colombia, and she’s currently based in Amsterdam.

“The artist skillfully fuses great traditions of painting and current practices of graffiti in her local surroundings,” a recent statement says. “She begins by collecting imagery, either found or from her own photography and sketches. These are then deconstructed and fragmented through collage to create new narratives. Surface and subject are finally sculpted into relief using thick layers of paint. The stories they tell are recognisable to the viewer, but left open and inviting interpretation.”

See more of her work below.

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