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Toshiya Masuda’s ‘Pixelated’ Ceramic Sculptures

Toshiya Masuda’s ceramic sculptures simulate the building blocks of pixels, creating everyday objects. The Japanese artist has been pursuing this fascination for several years with works that appear to be ripped from a classic 8-bit video game, predating Minecraft's bolstering of the aesthetic.

Toshiya Masuda’s ceramic sculptures simulate the building blocks of pixels, creating everyday objects. The Japanese artist has been pursuing this fascination for several years with works that appear to be ripped from a classic 8-bit video game, predating Minecraft’s bolstering of the aesthetic.


“He uses porcelain cubic pixel blocks as his language, and by flatten-ing various phenomena and conventional wisdom shaped by existing objects and ideas, expresses the contemporary world symbolically,” a statement says. “His work has two pillars: Low pixel CG series that deals with daily life with commodities or typical designer brand goods, and “pop icon” series that deals with masterpieces of the past.”

See more of the artist’s work below.

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