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Maggie Taylor’s Lewis Carroll Illustrations Featured in New Show

In a new show at Littlejohn Contemporary in New York City, Maggie Taylor's digital composite prints relay the tales in Lewis Carroll’s writings with vintage-sourced, Victorian-inspired imagery. “Through The Looking-Glass and Other Stories” kicks off in conjunction with the release the book “Lewis Carroll’s ‘Through the Looking-Glass, And What Alice Found There,’” for which she provided works. The show runs Sept. 6 through Oct. 6.

In a new show at Littlejohn Contemporary in New York City, Maggie Taylor‘s digital composite prints relay the tales in Lewis Carroll’s writings with vintage-sourced, Victorian-inspired imagery. “Through The Looking-Glass and Other Stories” kicks off in conjunction with the release the book “Lewis Carroll’s ‘Through the Looking-Glass, And What Alice Found There,’” for which she provided works. The show runs Sept. 6 through Oct. 6.

“Irony is at the core of Carroll’s stories and even his use of language,” the galery says. “Thus it is especially appropriate that Taylor’s use of the contradictory illusions of photographic realism combined with digital montage surrealism serves as a visual parallel to Carroll’s literary methods. Perhaps more than any conventional illustrator or even Dali’s energetic surrealism, Taylor has created a visual counterpoint to Carroll’s writing style, not just illustrations of his story.’”

See more of Taylor’s work below.


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