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The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Robert Nelson’s Mixed-Media Clashes of Culture, Ideas

Robert Nelson's blends of pop flavor and art history are rendered in graphite and acrylic paints. The artist works in contrasts, pitting elegance and grotesqueness, stark patterns and fluid lines, against each other. The artist's work has recently been shown at spots throughout the West Coast.

Robert Nelson‘s blends of pop flavor and art history are rendered in graphite and acrylic paints. The artist works in contrasts, pitting elegance and grotesqueness, stark patterns and fluid lines, against each other. The artist’s work has recently been shown at spots throughout the West Coast.


“Some develop a world view through acquisition of unbiased knowledge, but the world view of many is pre-ordained by culture, or manipulated by institutions,” the artist says. “The world today is striking in its defined sides. How can there be such distinct good and bad in the world while most, in their heart, are on the side of good? I’m interested in contrast; innocence/corruption, the infinite/the finite, past/future, good/evil. It’s fascinating how meanings can change depending on point of view. I strive for images that are defined differently by each observer. An image where their experiences, prejudices and beliefs all combine into the final experience of the work.”

See more of Nelson’s work below.

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