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Jeffrey Chong Wang’s Reflects on Culture, Art History in Paintings

The work of Beijing-raised artist Jeffrey Chong Wang is imbued with reflection on the painter’s culture and nods to art history. These rich oil paintings move between the surreal and more realistic narrative. The work has lived in Canada since 1999, but cites those years in China as integral to his work.

The work of Beijing-raised artist Jeffrey Chong Wang is imbued with reflection on the painter’s culture and nods to art history. These rich oil paintings move between the surreal and more realistic narrative. The work has lived in Canada since 1999, but cites those years in China as integral to his work.

“All the figures that I create on canvas are myself in a way; they reflect my cultural upbringing, personal feelings, and experiences,” he says. “I think of them as characters in a drama, and the canvas as a stage. My work is a response to the imbalance between my inside feelings and the outside world. I fuse classical concepts and traditional techniques into my work using my own exaggerated figures. These figures reflect the history of western oil painting techniques but also show contemporary themes of eastern culture.”

See more of his work below.


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