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Victor Fota’s Recent Dystopian Paintings

Victor Fota’s paintings often explore our relationship to science and machines, with both retro notes and elaborate contraptions. Recent work also mixes in futuristic abstraction and seemingly alien lifeforms, with detailed studies that remove humanity from the scenes. A desperate or at least, uneasy vibe offers a dystopian slant to his visions. He was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

Victor Fota’s paintings often explore our relationship to science and machines, with both retro notes and elaborate contraptions. Recent work also mixes in futuristic abstraction and seemingly alien lifeforms, with detailed studies that remove humanity from the scenes. A desperate or at least, uneasy vibe offers a dystopian slant to his visions. He was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

“At the moment he lives and works in Bucharest and he’s focusing on experimenting with oil paintings which illustrate concepts and phenomena described by the scientific methods, combined with personal introspection,” a statement says.


See more of his recent work below.

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