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The New Contemporary Art Magazine

The Mixed-Media Lifeforms of Alexander Ross

Whether it’s his amorphous forms or otherworldly creatures, Alexander Ross's unusual texture are the result of blending colored pencil, crayon, graphite, and watercolors. The works are packed with notes of our own world’s ecosystems, each work a mysterious lifeform of its own. Just like his materials, the work’s origins are multi-sourced.

Whether it’s his amorphous forms or otherworldly creatures, Alexander Ross‘s unusual texture are the result of blending colored pencil, crayon, graphite, and watercolors. The works are packed with notes of our own world’s ecosystems, each work a mysterious lifeform of its own. Just like his materials, the work’s origins are multi-sourced.

“Ross is best known for his biomorphic imagery, wherein modeled forms suggest molecular ecosystems as viewed through a microscope, or surreal landscapes inspired by Max Ernst,” a statement says. “In recent years, the artist has developed a distinctive color palette in which occasional flashes of red and yellow emerge within multiple shades of green. Ross’s characteristic handling of paint – through which shapes are given dimensionality in incremental bands of shading – might suggest a photorealistic endeavor. However, viewed as a whole, his compositions can be understood more accurately as abstractions, in which the interplay of color and form, highlight and shadow become the focus.”

See more of his work below.

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