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Justin Favela’s Massive Piñata Sculptures, Installations

Justin Favela’s large-scale projects are inspired by the texture, vibrancy, and cultural context of the piñata, whether adorning massive buildings or creating life-sized car sculptures. The Las Vegas-bred artist "critiques stereotypes by assessing their absurdities and then exaggerating them," as described by the Denver Art Museum. His major work there, "Fridalanida," took an immerse approach.

Justin Favela’s large-scale projects are inspired by the texture, vibrancy, and cultural context of the piñata, whether adorning massive buildings or creating life-sized car sculptures. The Las Vegas-bred artist “critiques stereotypes by assessing their absurdities and then exaggerating them,” as described by the Denver Art Museum. His major work there, “Fridalanida,” took an immerse approach.

On the above project: “As a lifelong resident of Las Vegas, Justin Favela has been influenced by the cultural mash-ups so prevalent there. The pastiche of architectural styles and historical references serves as a launch pad for his studio practice. He notes that there are generations, or layers, of appropriation in his hometown: the Venetian casino complex and its furnishings are based on tourist images of Venice, while its structure encompasses shopping malls and slot machines, among other things, none of which exist in the Italian city.”

See more work from the artist below.

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