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The Miniatures of Leah Yao

Leah Yao’s talents in crafting miniatures have taken both bright and bleak forms, with the recent “Mini Memento Mori” representing the latter. More often than not, the artist's Instagram bio aptly describes her output: "I make clay food." The RISD student's above piece impresses in the details that add both humor and intrigue to the work.

Leah Yao’s talents in crafting miniatures have taken both bright and bleak forms, with the recent “Mini Memento Mori” representing the latter. More often than not, the artist’s Instagram bio aptly describes her output: “I make clay food.” The RISD student’s above piece impresses in the details that add both humor and intrigue to the work.


““How can the smallest art form convey large ideas?” the artist wrote. “By juxtaposing current issues with classic art themes of mortality and feasts, I hope to encourage the viewer to consider the sometimes-toxic food systems that constitute modern diets, and to think about what we create (ahem, miniature concrete pieces…) will exist on the planet after we are dead and gone.”

See more of Yao’s work below.


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