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David Krovblit’s Cerebral Collages

David Krovblit’s pop surrealist collages explore consumerism, sexuality, and other social themes. His "Porthole" series, in particular, juxtaposes retro exploration gear, floral arrangements, and Western iconography. His work is part of the current collage group show “Mèlange” at Arch Enemy Arts, running until Aug. 25.

David Krovblit’s pop surrealist collages explore consumerism, sexuality, and other social themes. His “Porthole” series, in particular, juxtaposes retro exploration gear, floral arrangements, and Western iconography. His work is part of the current collage group show “Mèlange” at Arch Enemy Arts, running until Aug. 25.

“Krovblit’s work is an experience, both visual and cerebral,” a statement says. “Each new piece exhibits well-crafted, colourful images steeped in highly conceptual, contemporary themes. Exploring social commentary, you can usually find a streak of humour running straight through his work. Pieces often incorporate compositing and retouching techniques that show his keen eye for detail and experience with the medium.”

See more of Krovblit’s work below.

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