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Mikiko Kumazawa’s Drawings, Sculptures Create Chaos Out of the Everyday

Mikiko Kumazawa’s hand brings both richness and chaos touch to contemporary life. Whether in pencil drawings or visceral sculptures, the Tokyo-based artist depicts worlds that are just connected enough to our realities to inspire anxiety. Kumazawa was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

Mikiko Kumazawa’s hand brings both richness and chaos touch to contemporary life. Whether in pencil drawings or visceral sculptures, the Tokyo-based artist depicts worlds that are just connected enough to our realities to inspire anxiety. Kumazawa was last featured on HiFructose.com here.


“Sprawling city townscapes, or rampantly growing plants, or a picture plane crammed to the brim with food: Kumazawa depicts scenes in which the everyday world that surrounds us has undergone a transformation. In the midst of these strange environments of continuous propagation and transformation, people appear not to be questioning the situation but instead to calmly accept it. Today, as the sense of both virtual reality and artificial reality’s presence in our lives increases year on year, and as every message we post on social media is recorded as indisputable actuality, there is the sensation of a gap gradually emerging between our experiences of the landscapes of the real and the memories of reality.”

See more of the artist’s work below.

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