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Gerhard Human’s Nostalgia-Fueled Explorations

The stirring work of South African artist Gerhard Human combines an off-kilter palette and a comic sensibility. In the current set of work titled "All we ever wanted was everything" at Supersonic Art, the artist shares his latest explorations.

The stirring work of South African artist Gerhard Human combines an off-kilter palette and a comic sensibility. In the current set of work titled “All we ever wanted was everything” at Supersonic Art, the artist shares his latest explorations.

Accoriding to a statement: “The South African artist says of his work, ‘(The show) pretty much sums up what youth felt like for me. Maybe it’s different elsewhere, but I grew up in South African suburbia; crackpot of conservatism and mainstream culture. Comics, films, skating, music and books were ways to escape that world, invoking a sort of over-excited optimism.’ With these thoughts and inspirations in mind, Human has created a spectacular world of visual fantasy.”

See more of the artist’s work below.


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