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Jesse Thompson’s Surreal, Narrative Sculptures

The surreal sculptures of Jesse Thompson pair youthful figures with massive, weathered "lifecasts", revealing deeper themes within each scene. The artist says these narrative three-dimensional scenes are inspired by comics and other forms of sequential art.

The surreal sculptures of Jesse Thompson pair youthful figures with massive, weathered “lifecasts”, revealing deeper themes within each scene. The artist says these narrative three-dimensional scenes are inspired by comics and other forms of sequential art.


Thompson paints, illustrates, and animates, as well. He describes his sculpting practice: “In my sculptures, I use a combination of modeling, life casting and found object,” the artist says. “Comparing the found and the indexical (life-cast) with the modeled within the same sculpture provides more than just textural interest. The indexed, or life-cast, objects seem to allude to absence, death or hollowness, that by comparison makes the modeled form seem more truly alive.”

See more of his work below.

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