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David Altmejd’s Strange Figurative Sculptures

David Altmejd’s unsettling mixed-media sculptures subvert and mutate the figurative, while exploring our relationship to science and mythology. With works like "L,oeil" (above), he uses a robust set of materials: expanded polystyrene, epoxy dough, fiberglass, resin, synthetic hair, quartz, Sharpie and pens, gold leaf, glass paint, and much more. Throughout these forms, Altmejd creates surreal embellishments with natural and unnatural emulations.

David Altmejd’s unsettling mixed-media sculptures subvert and mutate the figurative, while exploring our relationship to science and mythology. With works like “L,oeil” (above), he uses a robust set of materials: expanded polystyrene, epoxy dough, fiberglass, resin, synthetic hair, quartz, Sharpie and pens, gold leaf, glass paint, and much more. Throughout these forms, Altmejd creates surreal embellishments with natural and unnatural emulations.

“Over the course of the past fifteen years, David Altmejd has been working through questions about the relationship between the human body and larger energy systems of physics, electricity and biology,” a statement says. “The forms his works take tend towards the fantastical; he builds up complex characters who occupy unfamiliar mythological narratives, all the while alluding to the inevitable destruction and decay of all biological matter.”

See more of the artist’s work below.


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