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Tishk Barzanji’s Mixed-Media Works Explore Architecture, Western Experience

Tishk Barzanji plays with architecture and perspective in pastel-hued landscapes. The mixed-media works use both digital and photographic techniques to create these absorbing, yet off-kilter explorations. The use of varied sources takes the viewer in and far out of reality within a single work.

Tishk Barzanji plays with architecture and perspective in pastel-hued landscapes. The mixed-media works use both digital and photographic techniques to create these absorbing, yet off-kilter explorations. The use of varied sources takes the viewer in and far out of reality within a single work.

“My work is inspired by Ancient history, the Modernism movement, and my experiences in London since moving here in 1997,” the artist says. “My process is about space, colour, deconstruction, breaking boundaries, understanding the living space in this fast moving world and human interactions within these spaces. I lived in Dalston (London) back in 1998, where my passion for architecture and art began. The people I grew up with and the environment I was around, shaped my ideas to what I practice now.”

See more of the artist’s works below.

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