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Annie Montgomerie’s Surreal, Anthropomorphic Figures

The vulnerable expressions of Annie Montgomerie’s figures give them a surreal quality, each a product of recycled material. The U.K.-based mixed-media artist has built a following with her often-whimsical animal-human hybrids, often emphasizing the latter part of the equation in their essence. Each of these works are one-of-kind, the artist says.


The vulnerable expressions of Annie Montgomerie’s figures give them a surreal quality, each a product of recycled material. The U.K.-based mixed-media artist has built a following with her often-whimsical animal-human hybrids, often emphasizing the latter part of the equation in their essence. Each of these works are one-of-kind, the artist says.


“Each piece is individual and unique, and because of the recycled nature of my work no two pieces will be quite the same. Most of my fabrics are foraged locally where I live in Dorset. I use muslin, 100-percent wool felt, ‘up-cycled’ wool garments, velvet, leather, cotton, moleskin and blankets for wall hangings and figures. I then stitch on curious little things I find including vintage buttons, charms and jewelry.”

See more of her work below.

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