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Josie Morway’s Mystical Paintings Return in ‘Adaptations’

Josie Morway’s enigmatic, absorbing tableaus pair winged creatures with abstraction and peculiar textures. A new show at Creatura House in Seattle, titled "Adaptations," collects new oil and enamel paintings from the artist that show both the beauty of nature and dark encroachment of mankind. The artist was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

Josie Morway’s enigmatic, absorbing tableaus pair winged creatures with abstraction and peculiar textures. A new show at Creatura House in Seattle, titled “Adaptations,” collects new oil and enamel paintings from the artist that show both the beauty of nature and dark encroachment of mankind. The artist was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

The gallery says her work is “a blend of hyperrealism and the mystical.” The show starts today and runs through May 6.

“I’ve been thinking a lot about what we humans demand of – and project onto – the wild,” the artist says, in a statement. “Not only in the obvious sense of callous disrespect, the way we continue to relentlessly trample and deplete nature. Even those of us with the most reverence for nature demand so much from it… we expect it to inspire us, calm us, to symbolize us, to purify us and even to cure us. It’s a lot to ask.”

See more work from the show below.

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