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Johan Van Mullem’s Eerie, Supernatural Drawings

Johan Van Mullem's ghostly drawings take shape and dissipate across the page, often taking the form of weathered faces and muscular appendages. The artist is known for his dramatic paintings, yet even in the form of pencil, pen, and charcoal, the supernatural aspect of Van Mullem’s practice comes through.

Johan Van Mullem‘s ghostly drawings take shape and dissipate across the page, often taking the form of weathered faces and muscular appendages. The artist is known for his dramatic paintings, yet even in the form of pencil, pen, and charcoal, the supernatural aspect of Van Mullem’s practice comes through.


“His interest in art dates from his childhood, during which he tirelessly drew pictures of faces, a major theme in his work, going beyond portraiture,” a statement says. “Van Mullem instinctively captures the essence of humanity hidden in timeless faces that are barely representative. A painter of movement and light, Van Mullem works with highly diluted printer’s ink, which he builds up in layers.”

See more of the artist’s work below.

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